What happens when a manager leaves the company, or if a person gets a new manager?

Performance reviews, 360 degree feedback and objectives are employee-centric, but are also automatically visible to the current manager. When an employee gets a new manager, the new manager can access those documents automatically to see what previous managers had to say about the employee. The previous manager can still access all reviews she signed previously, even when she's not the current manager anymore.

Learn more about the details on the user management documentation.

  • The new manager will be able to edit an existing performance review in an open cycle. Before the new manager makes adjustments, the old manager's name will appear on the review. In order to have the new manager's name appear, they'll need to edit the review.
  • In rare cases, you may want to prevent this from happening, e.g. when a person from within a team gets promoted to lead that team. In this kind of delicate situation we'd recommend printing (or exporting to PDF) the performance reviews the new manager shouldn't be able to see and keeping these on file elsewhere. Then you'll need to delete these from within Small Improvements to keep them hidden from the new manager.
  • Continuous feedback is a little different: these messages belong to their author, and anything that was strictly personal remains strictly personal. If a manager has been keeping personal notes that she didn't want to share or sharing feedback or meeting minutes with select people only, then this data is not automatically transferred to anyone else. Just because something is work related doesn't mean it needs to be accessible to a random successor. If an employee wants his new manager to see continuous feedback he shared with his previous manager, he'll need to manually share it with his new manager.

If it's really urgent to access data of an employee that just left, you could of course reset that person's password and then log in as them. But that's about as ethical as spying on an employee's work emails, so we'd only recommend this for extremely important cases.

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